Reading in the Age of Constant Distraction

“I read books to read myself,” Sven Birkerts wrote in The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. Birkerts’s book, which turns twenty-five this year, is composed of fifteen essays on reading, the self, the convergence of the two, and the ways both are threatened by the encroachment of modern technology. As the culture around him underwent the sea change of the internet’s arrival, Birkerts feared that qualities long safeguarded and elevated by print were in danger of erosion: among them privacy, the valuation of individual consciousness, and an awareness of history—not merely the facts of it, but a sense of its continuity, of our place among the centuries and cosmos. “Literature holds meaning not as a content that can be abstracted and summarized, but as experience,” he wrote. “It is a participatory arena. Through the process of reading we slip out of our customary time orientation, marked by distractedness and surficiality, into the realm of duration.” Read morehttps://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/02/08/reading-in-the-age-of-constant-distraction/

2 thoughts on “Reading in the Age of Constant Distraction

  1. The WheatandTares says:

    So true. They used to say cursive writing or some craftsmanship is a “dying art,” but now, it can be said that reading is becoming a dying art as our culture becomes more and more dependent upon instant gratification and the quick “pro quos.” … ps. Thanks for the follow. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

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